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Story Time With Peter: The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Heist

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Story Time With Peter: The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Heist

Boston has a lot of cool history. Even if you don't feel like you know very much about Boston, you still probably already knew that. This was the city where the Revolutionary War started! The Boston Tea Party, Paul Revere's Midnight Ride, the Salem Witch Trials—the early history of the Boston area is rich with some of the most riveting stories that American history has to offer. And moving into the modern era, Boston still managed to be the site of some of America's most interesting historical sagas, from the Boston Strangler, to the Great Molasses Flood. However, to me, one story stands out above the rest, and it didn't happen all that long ago. 

The story I'm talking about is the heist of the Isabella Stuart Gardener Museum, which happened in 1990. 

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Peter Lands In Sicily: Exploring Catania

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Peter Lands In Sicily: Exploring Catania

Catania is the second largest city in Sicily. The population of Catania proper is about 320,000, but there are a combined 1.1 million people who live in the metro area. In Italy overall, Catania is the 10th biggest city, and the 7th largest metro area. This is a major population center for Sicily, second only to Palermo, which will be our last stop on this trip. Catania is not the most well-known place, but it's definitely not small either. It's actually really big, especially by Sicilian standards. But Catania's burgeoning population should be surprising. This isn't exactly prime real estate. 

Why? Because of Mount Etna.

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Peter's Perspective: The Cuban Revolution

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Peter's Perspective: The Cuban Revolution

The time has finally come. It's time to talk politics. But before that, I'm going to take 2 minutes to make sure that everybody is up to speed on the Cuban Revolution. 

The Cuban Revolution was one of the most unlikely success stories in modern history. Although fighting had been going on intermittently since 1953, it wasn't until 1956 that Fidel Castro (you've heard of him, right?) and 80 of his fellow rebels sailed a small yacht called the Granma from Veracruz, Mexico, back to their home country of Cuba... 

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Peter Explores Cuba's Indie Side: Matanzas

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Peter Explores Cuba's Indie Side: Matanzas

Matanzas is a small sea-side city that sits 56 miles (or 90 kilometers) east of Havana, on Cuba's northern coast. It's located in the Bay of Matanzas and is the capital of a province that is also called Matanzas, and it was definitely one of my favorite places in Cuba. 

We arrived in Matanzas via camione, and then our adventure began...  

Spoiler alert: this was one of my favorite places that we visited during our time in Cuba. 

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Peter’s Trip To Iceland, Folklore Edition: Demons, Monsters, Mermen, & More...

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Peter’s Trip To Iceland, Folklore Edition: Demons, Monsters, Mermen, & More...

From the craggily, black mountains, to the mossy green volcano-scapes, to the endless stretches of artic desert, to some of the world’s last glaciers, Iceland is the stuff of legends. And, as it turns out, Iceland has quite enough legends to go around! 

Before leaving for this trip, a friend of mine, who had recently returned from her own journey to Iceland, loaned me a book called A Traveller’s Guide To Icelandic Folk Tales by Jón R. Hjálmarsson. Now that I’ve lived to tell the tale, I want to share with you some of the more compelling tales that (supposedly) occurred in the places that I visited on my trip.

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Peter's Camera Roll: The Churches Of Iceland's Westfjords

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Peter's Camera Roll: The Churches Of Iceland's Westfjords

Of all the amazing pieces of civilization subsisting out here in the Westfjords, none sparked my interest like these tiny Icelandic churches. These little structures were often the only sign of human life for miles in any direction. Each time we caught a glimpse of the small pointy steeple from our place on the road, we would come to a screeching halt and dive off down the nearest dirt road to explore. No two of these churches were the same. Each was completely unique, and a few of them had even been left unlocked!

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Peter In Venice [Part 1]: Stowaway On A Venetian Boat

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Peter In Venice [Part 1]: Stowaway On A Venetian Boat

With it's legendary boats and canals, few other destinations possess the same fabled mystique as this fairy-tale city. Once a powerful autonomous kingdom in its own rite, Venice is composed of 118 small islands off the coast of Northeastern Italy. Before Venice was ~*Venice*~, these islands were nothing but swampy lagoons. These lagoons are thought to have been settled by Roman refugees who were fleeing invasions of the Germanic and Hun empires. There is no surviving historical record to give us any insight into Venice's formal founding, but some ancient Roman documents place these refugee fishermen here as early as the 1st century A.D. According to tradition though, the first church of Venice was officially established in 421 A.D., so that is the historically accepted year of Venice's founding.

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Peter's Guide To Istanbul: Tourist Edition

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Peter's Guide To Istanbul: Tourist Edition

This article is a brief guide to sightseeing in Istanbul, as well as a narrative of my experiences there. And it's been moved! This article has become a city guide in it's own rite, so when you click on this article, you'll be prompted to visit this guide in its new location. 

(It's better this way, I promise)

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Bagan, Burma: Peter Crawls Through 9th Century Buddhist Temples By Night

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Bagan, Burma: Peter Crawls Through 9th Century Buddhist Temples By Night

Bagan is an enormous temple complex, not unlike Angkor in Cambodia, about 430 miles north of Rangoon (Yangon). Unlike Angkor however, Bagan is still relatively unknown to tourists. Imagine going to Angkor 50 years ago, before backpacking became a thing. That is Bagan. Unlike Angkor Wat, there are no guards or signs. Literally the only rule is to take your shoes off before entering a temple. That is the Buddhist custom.

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